Debris found in search for MH370, says Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott

The Sydney Morning Herald, 20 March 2014

Summary:

  • Commercial satellites have captured images of several large objects in the ocean 2500km south-west of Perth;
  • The largest of the objects is up to 24 metres long;
  • There is no guarantee the objects are from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, but authorities have described it as the best lead they have had so far.

 A bit more about those aircraft en route to the potential debris.

  • a RAAF Orion aircraft first arrived on the scene at 1.50pm AEDT;
  • this was followed by a US Navy P8 Poseidon aircraft at 3pm;
  • a second RAAF Orion is expected to depart RAAF Base Pearce, north of Perth, at 6pm;
  • a New Zealand Air Force Orion, is due to depart at 8pm.

While US Navy surveillance planes are equipped with radar, cameras and electro-optical sensors, searching for objects on open water is an arduous task, with sailors at every window looking with binoculars and the plane diving to identify targets visually, said Michael Boston, a retired US Navy chief petty officer who’s served as an electronic warfare specialist on P3-C Orion surveillance plane.

A map showing the chronology of search areas in the hunt for MH370.A map showing the chronology of search areas in the hunt for MH370. Photo: Andrew Meares

 The Department of Defence has released the satellite imagery. One image shows a 24 metre piece of debris, the second shows a smaller section:

Imagery released by the Department of Defence showing the largest piece of potential wreckage.Imagery released by the Department of Defence showing the largest piece of potential wreckage.

 Here’s the second image released by the Department of Defence:

The satellite images released by the Department of Defence.The satellite images released by the Department of Defence.

 

 

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